Tracking Alcohol Macros - Can I drink with IIFYM? - IIFYM - IIFYM

Tracking Alcohol Macros – Can I drink with IIFYM?


Tracking Macros & Drinking Alcohol with IIFYM

Being in recovery for 17+ years I never really have to worry about the answer to this question, but of the 200+ emails, I get every day, 2 of them are about drinking.
It is for this reason that IIFYM.com has teamed up with the amazing contest prep coach, Paul Revelia of Pro Physiques to finally put the question to rest, with an answer that is easy to understand.

The following is what Paul has to say on the subject of drinking alcohol while tracking macros:

For most people, the social experience of life is a key ingredient to happiness. The inclusion of alcohol is very common during these social situations and for many who are looking to lose body fat the simple idea that they can’t consume alcohol is reason enough to avoid the process. So we ask the question, is it possible to lose body fat and still drink? Does tracking macros and drinking beer mix?  What about shots? Can we live a normal social life which involves drinking while still hitting our macros and reaching our fat loss goals?

The answer is yes, but how we get there takes a bit of math. The simple fact is that alcohol is one of the four macronutrients. Yes, there are four macro-nutrients; carbs, protein, fat, and alcohol, and that one contains calories, just like the other three macros in all of the foods we eat. Tracking our macros and by default, our caloric intake allows us to manage those numbers to ensure we create a deficit by eating less food than our body needs to start the fat loss process. Things get a bit more complicated when we examine the effects on body fat loss when we drink alcohol. For now, let’s start by discussing the idea of flexible dieting, or macronutrient tracking to see how alcohol would fit into daily goals when burning fat is at the top of our list.

“If we consume an alcoholic beverage which contains 80 calories that would mean reducing our carbohydrate intake by 20 grams for the day. Simple, right?”

For the purpose of rapid fat loss, a balanced diet should consist of sufficient protein, fat, and carbohydrates (without neglecting our fiber needs). There are varying theories on the specifics of those ratios which this article is not going to discuss so we will stick to the facts.
(If you want to figure out your specific cutting macros you can use the IIFYM Macro Calculator).


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First the math. Protein and Carbohydrates are roughly 4 calories per gram, while fat is 9 calories per gram. Alcohol doesn’t fit into these macronutrient groups and is a bit different, it contains 7 calories per gram. For the purposes of exchanging some of your daily macronutrients for alcohol, the math is not difficult at all. The most flexible macronutrient when it comes to a fat loss diet is the carbohydrate class. This is because both fat and protein are essential to our diet, while carbs are not required for us to survive. Knowing this, it only makes sense that we manipulate carbs rather than the fats or protein.

 

tracking alcohol with IIFYM

 

Exchanging Alcohol For Carbs and Fat

So let’s look at how we could replace an alcohol drink with carbs. Since every gram of carbs has roughly 4 calories, if we consume an alcoholic beverage which contains 80 calories that would mean reducing our carbohydrate intake by 20 grams for the day. Simple, right? For a person that has their fat loss macros set at 200 grams per day, reducing them to 180 grams would create the caloric balance we are after.

Alternatively, if you happen to have a good deal of fat in your diet, you could subtract the alcohol calories from your daily fat intake instead. The same equation for an 80 calorie beverage would mean we reduce daily fat intake by 9 grams. (Since fat has 9 calories per gram we divide 80 by 9 to yield 8.88, and round up to 9 for simplicity). So if your fat is set to 70 grams for the day, and you would simply lower your fat intake to 61 grams to make up for the 80 calorie alcoholic beverage you drank.
Lucky for us MacroTracker.com makes it super easy to track our macros and make adjustments on the fly!

If you really know what you are doing, you could also trade alcohol for a combination of carbs and fat rather than just one of them, which actually might be required if you are going all out for a night of shenanigans.

Athletes who are training during an intense phase and are in a constant state of recovery need to consider that “acute alcohol consumption, at the levels often consumed by athletes, may negatively alter normal immunoendocrine function, blood flow, and protein synthesis so that recovery from skeletal muscle injury may be impaired.”(Barnes) When recovery is impaired the successive training sessions may also be of a lower quality. An athlete who is interested in being in optimal condition as well as being able to perform at peak levels should certainly take this into consideration. For someone who in a part of the general population and is more interested in a sustainable fat loss diet, having alcohol may help make the process easier as it’s more socially acceptable to have a few drinks with friends than it is to avoid gatherings.

 

alcohol-macros-2

 

How Alcohol Consumption Affects Recovery

Recovery from training is a very important part of the process for improvement. The adaptations that occur as a result of training are the reason our body’s change for the better. The explanation for why our bodies do not recover as quickly due to alcohol consumption can be explained by the fact that protein synthesis is blunted as the body deals with processing alcohol. Allowing the body to rebuild is a necessary part of the fat loss process and “Alcohol (EtOH) decreases protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated signaling and blunts the anabolic response to growth factors in skeletal muscle.”(Steiner) For someone to consistently consume alcoholic beverages this process would be blunted repeatedly and interfere with performance and recovery.

“A successful fat loss program is going to require discipline in many situations and avoiding alcohol might just be one of the sacrafices you have to make to achieve your fat loss goals.”

Depending on your level of athletics this may nor not be a deal breaker. For someone who is interested in being active, enjoying the gym and social situations with friends there is certainly a very easy way to keep balance. Plan ahead for times when you might want to consume some alcohol, adjust your daily macronutrient and caloric goals to allow for it and move forward. Perhaps it is also worth mentioning that when alcohol is consumed our decision-making process is changed which could potentially lead to some off plan eating or drinking. A successful fat loss program is going to require discipline in many situations and avoiding alcohol might just be one of the sacrifices you have to make to achieve your fat loss goals. Know thyself when it comes to these situations so you can avoid a misstep.

For high-level athletes who are stressing their bodies daily to a high level, the decision becomes a bit more important. At this level of competition, the minor day to day decisions can have a large impact. This type of individual will often have a no alcohol policy in place to ensure adherence and a clear conscience on the day of a competition. For those at the highest levels the thinking is often will this benefit me, and if the answer is no, then it’s best to be avoided. Alcohol often fits this description.

Regardless of your goal, information is important in the decision-making process. Remember that alcohol can be exchanged for a combination of carbohydrates and fats in the diet. Using zero calorie mixers also helps to keep the macro’s lower. Plan ahead by looking at your daily goals and finding areas where you can exchange some calories and keep making progress while enjoying life.


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About the Author

Paul Revelia
Owner of Pro Physiques Inc.
Pro Natural Bodybuilder
IIFYM Coach, Paul Revelia

+ REFERENCES
  • Steiner, Jennifer L., and Charles H. Lang. "Alcohol Impairs Skeletal Muscle Protein Synthesis And Motor Signaling In A Time-Dependent Manner Following Electrically Stimulated Muscle Contraction." Journal Of Applied Physiology 117.10 (2014): 1170-1179. SPORTDiscus. Web. 1 Feb. 2016.
  • Barnes, Matthew. "Alcohol: Impact On Sports Performance And Recovery In Male Athletes." Sports Medicine 44.7 (2014): 909.Publisher Provided Full Text Searching File. Web. 1 Feb. 2016.

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  • Ygor

    How can I calculate the total amount of alcohol (in g) for an 200ml beverage that has, for example, 14% volume? By it’s weight?

    • dailymacrostruggle

      chemistry based
      14% = 14g/100ml
      (14/100)*200ml = 28g/ml
      alcohol density = 0.789g/ml
      28*0.789 = 22g of alcohol
      22g alcohol * 7 cal = ~155cal from alcohol, depending on beverage might have carbs as well (beer)

      • Phil Sheo

        You get the correct answer, but your units and method are incorrect. Alcohol by Volume (ABV) of 14% would be defined as 14 mL/100 mL, not 14 g/100 mL; but it is unnecessary to be convert the percentage at all since ABV is expressed as volume percent. Multiply that by the total volume consumed of 200 mL and then the density of ethanol of 0.789 g/mL get the answer and correct units.

        In other words:

        0.140 * 200 mL * 0.789 g/mL = 22.092 g of ethanol

        Then multiply by 7 kcal/g and you get the 155 kcal (154.644 kcal) at which you arrived.

        I apologize if this may be a bit nitpicky, but I have a degree in Chemistry and that stuck out to me – if you multiply g/mL by g/mL, you get g²/mL², not g. Besides, this is a simpler calculation than trying to do derivations.

  • Jadi

    I’m confused, why adjust the amount of fats when you’re increasing the intake of carbs through beer? Why not simply reduce the carbs you eat and fit the carb intake in that manner?

    • Burnin Vernon

      1 gram of carbohydrate = 4 kcal
      therefore 20 g of carbohydrates = 80 kcal

  • I wish they would just invent a protein beer already

  • Sarah Leed

    I just figure in the calories when I drink. Much simpler, and it has no affect on my weight.

  • Laura Hernandez

    Thank you for this informative info…I wasn’t aware I needed to calculate alcohol like that but I don’t drink very often so not a big deal. Paul has been my coach for the last 7 months and he is awesome!

  • kelly

    can i just do it in my fitness pal and try to stay under cals?

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  • I’m confused. The article states:

    “Protein and Carbohydrates are roughly 4 calories per gram, while fat is 9 calories per gram. Alcohol doesn’t fit into these macronutrient groups and is a bit different, it contains 7 calories per gram.”

    And then:

    “Since every gram of carbs has roughly 4 calories, if we consume an alcoholic beverage which contains 80 calories that would mean reducing our carbohydrate intake by 20 grams for the day.”

    What am I missing? Why tell us there are 7 calories per gram of “alcohol”, and then when the calculation is done, it’s done with the 4 calories per gram of carbs? How do we get from 11.4g “alcohol” (80 calories / 7 “alcohol” calories per gram) to 20g carbs?

    Or is the article just telling us information that is completely irrelevant, that alcohol grams are not P/C/F, and you should just log alcohol based off the carbs that make up the total calorie intake of the drink?

    • Graham Satterwhite

      He’s saying you remove carbs from your diet if you consume alcohol.

      It is very pertinent that you know that alcohol has 7 Cal/g so you can do the calculation yourself so you can figure out how many fewer grams of carbs to eat.

      He could have said, “you consume 11.4 grams of alcohol, and 11.4g * 7 Cal/g = 80 Cal from alcohol, so to find out how many fewer grams of carb to eat that would be 80 Cal / 4 Cal/g = 20 grams of carbs”.

  • Gustavo Goretti

    I have one question. Do I have to track only the alcohol or the alcohol and the carbs on beers?
    40.7 kcal Carbs 3,3g

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