Macro Diet Plan for Fast Weight Loss • IIFYM • Calculate Your Macros - Feed https://www.iifym.com Wed, 16 Oct 2019 20:46:52 +0000 en-US Keto Diet for Weight Loss and The Macro Calculator https://www.iifym.com/keto-calculator/keto-diet/keto-diet-for-weight-loss-and-the-macro-calculator/ Sun, 22 Sep 2019 17:23:33 +0000 https://www.iifym.com/macro-calculator/macronutrients/keto-macro-calculator/ This diet isn't simply another type of low-carb diet. There are some people who claim it is basically just another repackaging of older weight loss diets. However, that is not actually true. The Atkins diet limits fat, restrict carbs and focuses on consuming lots of protein. The Paleo diet isn't actually a real low-carb diet but it does restrict certain foods that are high in carbs, especially grains. You can learn more about paleo macros here.

On the other hand, the keto diet is very low in carbs and really high in fat. It has been designed so that the human body goes into a ketosis state, where instead of burning glucose for fuel it burns fats.

Technical Aspects

The keto diet promotes a form of 'pseudo fasting.' After only 72 to 96 hours of either sticking to a very low-carb diet or fasting, the human body depletes itself of stores of sugars and starch that are immediately available. At that point, it switches to burning fat as its main fuel source. Go to the Keto Calculator Page Here.

A genuine keto diet may limit carbs to a maximum of 20 to 50 grams per day, and they come primarily from non starchy vegetables. Protein needs to be balanced in a way that enough of it is consumed in order to maintain lean body mass, but low enough at the same time to preserve ketosis, since there are certain amino acids that may be converted into glucose that can put a stop to the ketosis state.

After about one week, the human body goes into a full ketosis state that reduces the amount of insulin secretion. Acetyl-CoA is also overproduced which results in ketones being formed such as acetone and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. Ketones can cross into the blood-brain barrier, meaning that it can feed the brain that is normally hungry for glucose but fatty acids cannot be used for fuel.

Side Effects

You should always consult with your doctor prior to making any changes to your exercise or die. The same is true when switching to a keto diet. Many medical professionals fully endorse this diet due to so many people needing to lose weight. One-third of adults are obese, and twice that many people are overweight.

Being overweight can create various risk factors for diseases, injuries, and illness that range from stroke to heart attacks, diabetes, cancer and even premature death at times.

However, although the ketogenic diet can produce great results, and the diet can be fairly easy to stick with, given its focus on macros and approach, it isn't always too enjoyable to get started. Those who follow this type of diet should commit to a minimum of three months to see how it goes for them since it can take four to five weeks to really settle into the routine of a new diet plan.

The human body undergoes some drastic changes that can be uncomfortable if they are done too fast. There is one common side effect that is referred to as 'keto flu. It can result in a combination of symptoms that include fatigue, lightheadedness, headaches, constipation, and nausea, due to the body rapidly excreting sodium and the restriction on carbs.

the keto diet facts and fiction

The Keto Diet For Losing Weight And The Macro Breakdowns

When a ketogenic diet is followed, there are some general guidelines that are available to help break down the macronutrients according to certain ratios. Above all, the diet is considered to be low-carb since only around 5 to 10 percent of total calories should come from carbs. A moderate amount of protein should be consumed ranging from 15 to 30 percent of total calories consumed.

The keto diet is extremely high in fat, which 60 to 80 percent of total calories coming from sources of fat. One thing to note is that not all fat sources need to come from animal fats.

Lots of Fat

A majority of your keto diet plan is going to come from fat. Fortunately, there are many delicious ways to incorporate plenty of fat into your diet. Most people love steak and bacon, so you can always start there. Oils like avocado and olive oil are also good sources of fat, along with cream cheese, hard cheeses, butter, and mayonnaise.

Protein For An Added Punch

If you consume too much protein, you may get the amino acids we were discussing earlier that can take you out of the ketosis state. On the other hand, if you get a sufficient amount of protein, you can end up burning muscle tissue in addition to fat. You may even be at risk for heart damage. Another healthy protein source is fish, and tuna in particular, which means you can eat foods like tuna salad and tuna rolls as sources of protein.

For more variety, consider pork and chicken. Beef can be beneficial, and eggs are a very versatile source of protein.

Cracking Down On Carbs

When your body is starved of starches and sugars is causes your body to switch from glucose to fat as its fuel source. So you will need to start avoiding eating foods like white bread, pasta, rice, and potatoes along with sugary drinks and soft drinks. Fortunately, you can still eat things like zucchini noodles, cauliflower, bread, and bagels.

When it comes to fruits and vegetables, you can eat as many leafy greens and broccoli that you want to, along with strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries.

Beverages Are Also Important

The main beverage you should consume most of the time is water. Coffee and tea are also allowed by most keto diets. Unfortunately, milk is not that great due to the act that the human body converts lactose into sugar. Rather than adding milk to your coffee, try using heavy cream, coconut oil, or butter instead. If you drink alcohol, instead of beer, try to drink wine instead.

How To Use A Keto Macro Calculator To Achieve Your Weight Loss Goals

Although it is possible to figure out your macros by hand using a pen and paper, or the calculator on your smartphone, there is an easier and more effective. There is a free online macro calculator that you can use at https://iifym.com/keto-calculator.

There are three main things that this macro calculator can do for you. First of all, it crunches all of the numbers for you automatically. Second, it can help you determine the number of calories you need to meet your weight loss goals.

Third, the calculator will break down the exact macro split of carbs, proteins, and fats that you need to eat on your keto diet to achieve your weight loss goals and ensure that get all of the nutrients that your body needs.

Once you are armed with this information, it will make it easy to stick to your diet, develop your meal plans, and stick to your keto diet to achieve your weight loss goals.

You can be confident knowing that you are applying the right macro split of carbs, proteins, and fats for your individual situation and goals. In turn, that will make it easy to track your macros and total food intake throughout the day. It takes all of the guesswork out of whether or not you are consuming the correct ratios to lose weight, and help you easily achieve a ketosis state and stay there as long as necessary!

All-Diets-Work-In-The-Exact-Same-Way-They-Cut-Your-Calorie-Intake

Easy and Convenient

The keto macro calculator makes it very easy to figure out your macros and then use this information to apply a keto diet to lose weight. The calculator is also very easy to use. All you need to do is answer some basic questions on factors such as your gender, age, weight, height, exercise level, current eating habits, and your medical background.

The calculator takes all of these factors and more into account when determining your ideal macro splits.

Each of the questions is multiple choice and offers helpful explanations if you are not sure which one to choose. Most of the questions are very easy to answer, and you simply plug in the numbers and you will be provided with your macro splits to use when planning your meals. It really is that easy!

Tools You May Need

Along with knowing which foods you can and cannot eat and the best macro breakdowns for your situation are a great starting point. However, there are other things you might need to really stick with a keto diet over the long term to lose weight.

Having a good food scale is important. Your best option is a high-precision digital model. They can be found online as well as at local retail stores in your area. Find one that is easy to use, affordable, and has great reviews. Keep it in a prominent place in the kitchen so it's always on hand when you need it.

Another useful resource is keto diet cookbooks. You can get started by seeing if your local library has any books for some free ideas. You can also buy some cookbooks later once you have some experience. The key to staying on a keto diet over the long term is finding easy to make, tasty and nutritious meals.

Conclusion

Following a keto diet to lose weight is a very effective method. Once you understand macronutrients and the science behind them, you will have a good understanding of how the keto diet works.

Fortunately, the free keto macro calculator and other useful tools make it very easy to understand and follow the keto diet so that you can achieve your weight loss goals and eat a well-balanced diet that provides your body with all of the nutrients it needs to stay healthy.

 

The following post Keto Diet for Weight Loss and The Macro Calculator is available on IIFYM STORE IIFYM MEMBERSHIP

]]>
This diet isn't simply another type of low-carb diet. There are some people who claim it is basically just another repackaging of older weight loss diets. However, that is not actually true. The Atkins diet limits fat, restrict carbs and focuses on consuming lots of protein. The Paleo diet isn't actually a real low-carb diet but it does restrict certain foods that are high in carbs, especially grains. You can learn more about paleo macros here.

On the other hand, the keto diet is very low in carbs and really high in fat. It has been designed so that the human body goes into a ketosis state, where instead of burning glucose for fuel it burns fats.

Technical Aspects

The keto diet promotes a form of 'pseudo fasting.' After only 72 to 96 hours of either sticking to a very low-carb diet or fasting, the human body depletes itself of stores of sugars and starch that are immediately available. At that point, it switches to burning fat as its main fuel source. Go to the Keto Calculator Page Here.

A genuine keto diet may limit carbs to a maximum of 20 to 50 grams per day, and they come primarily from non starchy vegetables. Protein needs to be balanced in a way that enough of it is consumed in order to maintain lean body mass, but low enough at the same time to preserve ketosis, since there are certain amino acids that may be converted into glucose that can put a stop to the ketosis state.

After about one week, the human body goes into a full ketosis state that reduces the amount of insulin secretion. Acetyl-CoA is also overproduced which results in ketones being formed such as acetone and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. Ketones can cross into the blood-brain barrier, meaning that it can feed the brain that is normally hungry for glucose but fatty acids cannot be used for fuel.

Side Effects

You should always consult with your doctor prior to making any changes to your exercise or die. The same is true when switching to a keto diet. Many medical professionals fully endorse this diet due to so many people needing to lose weight. One-third of adults are obese, and twice that many people are overweight.

Being overweight can create various risk factors for diseases, injuries, and illness that range from stroke to heart attacks, diabetes, cancer and even premature death at times.

However, although the ketogenic diet can produce great results, and the diet can be fairly easy to stick with, given its focus on macros and approach, it isn't always too enjoyable to get started. Those who follow this type of diet should commit to a minimum of three months to see how it goes for them since it can take four to five weeks to really settle into the routine of a new diet plan.

The human body undergoes some drastic changes that can be uncomfortable if they are done too fast. There is one common side effect that is referred to as 'keto flu. It can result in a combination of symptoms that include fatigue, lightheadedness, headaches, constipation, and nausea, due to the body rapidly excreting sodium and the restriction on carbs.

the keto diet facts and fiction

The Keto Diet For Losing Weight And The Macro Breakdowns

When a ketogenic diet is followed, there are some general guidelines that are available to help break down the macronutrients according to certain ratios. Above all, the diet is considered to be low-carb since only around 5 to 10 percent of total calories should come from carbs. A moderate amount of protein should be consumed ranging from 15 to 30 percent of total calories consumed.

The keto diet is extremely high in fat, which 60 to 80 percent of total calories coming from sources of fat. One thing to note is that not all fat sources need to come from animal fats.

Lots of Fat

A majority of your keto diet plan is going to come from fat. Fortunately, there are many delicious ways to incorporate plenty of fat into your diet. Most people love steak and bacon, so you can always start there. Oils like avocado and olive oil are also good sources of fat, along with cream cheese, hard cheeses, butter, and mayonnaise.

Protein For An Added Punch

If you consume too much protein, you may get the amino acids we were discussing earlier that can take you out of the ketosis state. On the other hand, if you get a sufficient amount of protein, you can end up burning muscle tissue in addition to fat. You may even be at risk for heart damage. Another healthy protein source is fish, and tuna in particular, which means you can eat foods like tuna salad and tuna rolls as sources of protein.

For more variety, consider pork and chicken. Beef can be beneficial, and eggs are a very versatile source of protein.

Cracking Down On Carbs

When your body is starved of starches and sugars is causes your body to switch from glucose to fat as its fuel source. So you will need to start avoiding eating foods like white bread, pasta, rice, and potatoes along with sugary drinks and soft drinks. Fortunately, you can still eat things like zucchini noodles, cauliflower, bread, and bagels.

When it comes to fruits and vegetables, you can eat as many leafy greens and broccoli that you want to, along with strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries.

Beverages Are Also Important

The main beverage you should consume most of the time is water. Coffee and tea are also allowed by most keto diets. Unfortunately, milk is not that great due to the act that the human body converts lactose into sugar. Rather than adding milk to your coffee, try using heavy cream, coconut oil, or butter instead. If you drink alcohol, instead of beer, try to drink wine instead.

How To Use A Keto Macro Calculator To Achieve Your Weight Loss Goals

Although it is possible to figure out your macros by hand using a pen and paper, or the calculator on your smartphone, there is an easier and more effective. There is a free online macro calculator that you can use at https://iifym.com/keto-calculator.

There are three main things that this macro calculator can do for you. First of all, it crunches all of the numbers for you automatically. Second, it can help you determine the number of calories you need to meet your weight loss goals.

Third, the calculator will break down the exact macro split of carbs, proteins, and fats that you need to eat on your keto diet to achieve your weight loss goals and ensure that get all of the nutrients that your body needs.

Once you are armed with this information, it will make it easy to stick to your diet, develop your meal plans, and stick to your keto diet to achieve your weight loss goals.

You can be confident knowing that you are applying the right macro split of carbs, proteins, and fats for your individual situation and goals. In turn, that will make it easy to track your macros and total food intake throughout the day. It takes all of the guesswork out of whether or not you are consuming the correct ratios to lose weight, and help you easily achieve a ketosis state and stay there as long as necessary!

All-Diets-Work-In-The-Exact-Same-Way-They-Cut-Your-Calorie-Intake

Easy and Convenient

The keto macro calculator makes it very easy to figure out your macros and then use this information to apply a keto diet to lose weight. The calculator is also very easy to use. All you need to do is answer some basic questions on factors such as your gender, age, weight, height, exercise level, current eating habits, and your medical background.

The calculator takes all of these factors and more into account when determining your ideal macro splits.

Each of the questions is multiple choice and offers helpful explanations if you are not sure which one to choose. Most of the questions are very easy to answer, and you simply plug in the numbers and you will be provided with your macro splits to use when planning your meals. It really is that easy!

Tools You May Need

Along with knowing which foods you can and cannot eat and the best macro breakdowns for your situation are a great starting point. However, there are other things you might need to really stick with a keto diet over the long term to lose weight.

Having a good food scale is important. Your best option is a high-precision digital model. They can be found online as well as at local retail stores in your area. Find one that is easy to use, affordable, and has great reviews. Keep it in a prominent place in the kitchen so it's always on hand when you need it.

Another useful resource is keto diet cookbooks. You can get started by seeing if your local library has any books for some free ideas. You can also buy some cookbooks later once you have some experience. The key to staying on a keto diet over the long term is finding easy to make, tasty and nutritious meals.

Conclusion

Following a keto diet to lose weight is a very effective method. Once you understand macronutrients and the science behind them, you will have a good understanding of how the keto diet works.

Fortunately, the free keto macro calculator and other useful tools make it very easy to understand and follow the keto diet so that you can achieve your weight loss goals and eat a well-balanced diet that provides your body with all of the nutrients it needs to stay healthy.

 

The following post Keto Diet for Weight Loss and The Macro Calculator is available on IIFYM STORE IIFYM MEMBERSHIP

]]>
Does a Higher Daily Protein Intake Keep You Leaner in the Offseason https://www.iifym.com/iifym-calculator/does-a-higher-daily-protein-intake-keep-you-leaner-in-the-offseason/ Wed, 18 Sep 2019 17:24:21 +0000 https://www.iifym.com/?p=52185---71ecb6ad-5cfd-47f9-8b2b-39f0eaa49f7b

 

Picture this…You just ended your 28-week contest prep diet or 16-week vacation dieting phase.

Your daily protein intake is through the roof, you are sick and tired of sucking down protein shakes, your jaw is exhausted from chewing animal protein sources, and you are fed up with the extra money being spent on protein sources.

We all know by now that a higher daily protein intake during a calorie deficit has its benefits, there’s no arguing this (1).

What if we told you it may be worth experimenting with a higher protein diet during the offseason?

In this article, we will look into the protein overfeeding research, see some of the pros and cons to a higher daily protein diet during the offseason, and give you some practical applications that you can implement right after finishing this article.

(Side Note: a good tool to track your daily protein intake is with the IIFYM flexible dieting calculator)

Get your protein shakes ready!

What’s Protein Overfeeding and Why Should You Care?

Jose Antonio and his lab are doing some fascinating research on protein overfeeding and we are almost certain that if you are reading this article, you know that the recommended daily allowance on daily protein intake is 1.76 g/kg/d (0.8 g/lb.) (2,3).

Now what’s cool about what Antonio and his colleagues did was they challenged this RDA of daily protein intake notion and overfed subjects with higher daily protein intakes.

Here’s what they did in their 2015 Protein Overfeeding Study:

  • They took resistance trained subjects
  • Provided a sound resistance training program
  • Had subjects tracked food on My fitness pal
  • Took 2 groups and compared regular protein (0.8g/lb.) vs high protein (1.4g/lb.)
  • They used a Bod Pod to measure body composition

The results showed:

The higher daily protein group lost an average of 1.6 kg (3.5 lbs.) of fat mass versus 0.3 kg (.66 lbs.) and ended up consuming approximately 400 calories more a day.

What’s interesting is there have been speculations over the “disappearance” of extra and higher daily protein intake which includes (4):

  • A higher thermic effect of feeding (body burns more calories during digestion)
  • Increased NEAT (non-exercise activity thermogenesis)
  • Increased TEE (total energy expenditure)
  • Increased fecal energy excretion (poop actually has more calories in it so you haven't assimilated as much of what you ate)
  • Reduced intake of other macronutrients via increased satiety
  • Suppressed hepatic lipogenesis (suppressed liver fat accumulation)
  • Decreased misreporting of food intake

 

 

Moreover, a year later, Antonio and colleagues conducted another overfeeding study and here’s what they concluded:

“In male subjects with several years of experience with resistance training, chronic consumption of a diet high in protein had no harmful effects on any measures of health. Furthermore, there was no change in body weight, fat mass or lean body mass despite eating more total calories and protein. Contrary to popular belief, the consumption of a high protein diet is not mutually exclusive with a diet high in fiber nor does the consumption of cholesterol above the standard recommendations results in any untoward effects on blood lipids. This is the first 1-year longitudinal investigation in resistance trained males that demonstrates the lack of harm caused by a high protein diet.”

After seeing these studies by Antonio and colleagues, it has really put together a piece to a massive puzzle that in a real-world setting, one could have a higher daily protein intake, and overconsume protein, and get great benefits from it.

A Deeper Look at What a Higher Daily Protein Intake in the Offseason Can Really Do

A 2017 study out of the International Journal of Sports Science took 19 male bodybuilders and put them into 2 groups (5):

  • Group 1- Overfeeding subjects (mainly overfeeding with carbohydrates) and 0.8g/lb. of protein per day
  • Group 2- Protein overfeeding subjects (mainly overfeeding with protein) and 1.4g/lb. of protein per day
  • Total calories were matched and training volume was matched

The results showed that the protein overfeeding group led to increased muscle mass, reduced body fat, and improved blood panels.

 

What’s interesting in this study is it was done in bodybuilders, calories and training volume were matched, and if you do the math in practical terms, just as an example, Group 1- 150-pound male x 0.8 = 120g of daily protein and in Group 2- 150-pound male x 1.4 = 210g of daily protein. Which shows a 90g daily difference of protein intake.

Another interesting study was done by Beals and colleagues, where they took 30 female subjects and divided them into 3 groups (6):

  • Group 1- Overweight subjects
  • Group 2- Obese subjects
  • Group 3- Healthy weight subjects

They gave each group 170g of lean pork which turns into about 36g of high-quality protein post workout and showed the obese and overweight subjects had blunted muscle protein synthesis responses (prohibited your body from being in a muscle growth state) and it was most likely due to the excess body fat they were carrying.

Now, obviously, this study has a lot of limitations and the ones that stand out most are:

  • we need a larger sample size of people
  • this needs to be replicated in athletes or resistance trained subjects
  • there was no resistance training protocol
  • we don’t truly eat protein in isolation
  • more long-term studies need to be conducted

But, this could be a good start to a large puzzle on perhaps having a higher daily protein intake and staying leaner in the offseason to make sure you’re getting a daily response with muscle protein synthesis which over time will keep your body in a muscle growth state and lead to more muscle growth.

A great way to experiment with this is most likely having a higher daily protein intake like the overfeeding studies suggest and really taking advantage of the protein adaptations.

Pros-and-Cons

 

Pros and Cons of a Daily Higher Protein Intake During the Off Season

This area of research really interested us, so we ran our own individual experiments for a full month.

Now, keep in mind we controlled as much as we possibly could, these weren’t actually in lab-controlled experiments, and it was only a month.

We made some interesting observations with a high protein intake during a surplus, along with what the current data says about protein overfeeding, along with the two studies above, and we have compiled some pros and cons to having a higher protein diet during the offseason:

Pros:

  • Leads to less overeating, due to more satiety and protein being the number one most filling macronutrient
  • Increased TEF (Thermic Effect of Food) due to your body working harder to break down protein
  • If you have a personal preference to consume higher protein amounts, then this may work for you
  • There’s something about being more accurate with tracking food when you have a higher protein goal, so this may lead to eating less processed and packaged foods and being more accurate with your macros and calories as research shows misreporting is a big reason why people don’t get results (7)
  • Don’t quote us on this, but a higher protein intake during a surplus combined with a proper high-volume resistance training program may lead to further muscular adaptations. Yet, Roberts and colleagues showed there was no major difference between a high vs moderate protein intake in resistance trained subjects (8). More long-term and replicated studies need to be conducted in this specific area
  • Eating a higher protein intake post diet phase leads to lower weight re-gain due to increased muscle mass, increased REE (Resting Energy Expenditure), increased TEF (Thermic Effect of Food), and Increased satiety (9)

Cons:

  • Higher protein intake may not be a viable option if you don’t have a personal preference for a higher protein intake
  • Higher protein intake in a surplus won’t be feasible if you are vegetarian or vegan
  • Higher protein intake in a surplus could get financially expensive since protein is the most expensive macronutrient
  • The theory of a “Muscle Full Effect” could come into play (10). Some researchers have proposed that muscle protein synthesis tops out at approximately 20-25 grams of protein per serving for young adults. Protein consumed above this dosage is thought to be oxidized for energy rather than used for tissue-building purposes – a phenomenon called the “muscle-full” effect. In what is often cited as the definitive support for this contention, Areta et al investigated the effect of different protein boluses on resistance-trained men (11)
  • All subjects performed a bout of resistance training and were then confined to rest where they consumed 80 grams of protein over a 12-hour recovery period in one of the following three conditions (11):

  • 8 servings of 10 grams of protein every 1.5 hours
  • 4 servings of 20 grams of protein every 3 hours
  • 2 servings of 40 grams of protein every 6 hours

  • Over the course of the recovery period, the greatest effect on stimulation of muscle protein synthesis was seen in the group consuming 4 servings of 20 grams of protein. This would seem to indicate that there was no added benefit to consuming the higher dosage (40 grams) and that the additional amino acids were indeed oxidized for energy (11)
  • Trained individuals may have a lower requirement for protein due to increased efficiency of use of protein. Several studies have shown that resistance trained athletes, consistent with the anabolic stimulus for protein synthesis it provides, actually increases the efficiency of use of protein, which reduces dietary protein requirements (12). If indeed, regular heavy resistance training enhances efficiency, there would be no effect of added protein and body comp alterations

Practical Applications

If you are interested in trying a high protein intake during the offseason or having your clients try it, we recommend first setting your daily calorie surplus and then setting protein at 1.4g/lb.

Ex.) You are consuming 3,000 calories and you weight 175 pounds, multiply 175 x 1.4 = 245g of daily protein and multiply that by 4 (4 calories per 1 gram of protein) = 980 calories. You are then left with 2,020 calories for carbs and fats.

Then Set fat after that, anywhere from 20-30% of calories.

Then set the remaining calories as carbs and partition more of them around workouts unless you have a personal preference for other times of the day.

Experiment with it for a month or so with yourself or your clients, get both objective and subjective data from it, controlling everything as much as possible then re-evaluate everything.

Don’t expect more muscular adaptations from the higher protein intake, as this will most likely be from the calorie surplus and increased training volume in your resistance training program.

We highly recommend this for clients or those out of a long contest prep where one lost a significant amount of weight and calories became very low so most likely metabolic adaptations occurred from satiety signals being down, hunger hormones up, and reward system cravings for highly palatable foods were increased (13).

We also recommend experimenting with a higher protein intake for clients or someone that has a tendency to binge or overeat especially those post prep or dieting phase.

Wrap Up

Now that you have the secret ninja tips (HIYAAAA) to try a higher protein intake during a surplus, the biggest piece of advice we can give after self-experimenting with this and diving into the research is to have an open mind and just try it out for a month.

See how you respond to it. See how you feel. See what kind of observations you make out of it all. And just have fun with it all as this is what a flexible fitness journey should be about. Taking valid scientific research and implementing it into practice.

There’s only one thing we ask of you after having a higher protein intake during a surplus, don’t come knocking on our door after you see your weekly grocery bill?

 

Does a Higher Daily Protein Intake Keep You Leaner in the Offseason is republished from IIFYM Blog IIFYM MEMBERSHIP

]]>

 

Picture this…You just ended your 28-week contest prep diet or 16-week vacation dieting phase.

Your daily protein intake is through the roof, you are sick and tired of sucking down protein shakes, your jaw is exhausted from chewing animal protein sources, and you are fed up with the extra money being spent on protein sources.

We all know by now that a higher daily protein intake during a calorie deficit has its benefits, there’s no arguing this (1).

What if we told you it may be worth experimenting with a higher protein diet during the offseason?

In this article, we will look into the protein overfeeding research, see some of the pros and cons to a higher daily protein diet during the offseason, and give you some practical applications that you can implement right after finishing this article.

(Side Note: a good tool to track your daily protein intake is with the IIFYM flexible dieting calculator)

Get your protein shakes ready!

What’s Protein Overfeeding and Why Should You Care?

Jose Antonio and his lab are doing some fascinating research on protein overfeeding and we are almost certain that if you are reading this article, you know that the recommended daily allowance on daily protein intake is 1.76 g/kg/d (0.8 g/lb.) (2,3).

Now what’s cool about what Antonio and his colleagues did was they challenged this RDA of daily protein intake notion and overfed subjects with higher daily protein intakes.

Here’s what they did in their 2015 Protein Overfeeding Study:

  • They took resistance trained subjects
  • Provided a sound resistance training program
  • Had subjects tracked food on My fitness pal
  • Took 2 groups and compared regular protein (0.8g/lb.) vs high protein (1.4g/lb.)
  • They used a Bod Pod to measure body composition

The results showed:

The higher daily protein group lost an average of 1.6 kg (3.5 lbs.) of fat mass versus 0.3 kg (.66 lbs.) and ended up consuming approximately 400 calories more a day.

What’s interesting is there have been speculations over the “disappearance” of extra and higher daily protein intake which includes (4):

  • A higher thermic effect of feeding (body burns more calories during digestion)
  • Increased NEAT (non-exercise activity thermogenesis)
  • Increased TEE (total energy expenditure)
  • Increased fecal energy excretion (poop actually has more calories in it so you haven't assimilated as much of what you ate)
  • Reduced intake of other macronutrients via increased satiety
  • Suppressed hepatic lipogenesis (suppressed liver fat accumulation)
  • Decreased misreporting of food intake

 

 

Moreover, a year later, Antonio and colleagues conducted another overfeeding study and here’s what they concluded:

“In male subjects with several years of experience with resistance training, chronic consumption of a diet high in protein had no harmful effects on any measures of health. Furthermore, there was no change in body weight, fat mass or lean body mass despite eating more total calories and protein. Contrary to popular belief, the consumption of a high protein diet is not mutually exclusive with a diet high in fiber nor does the consumption of cholesterol above the standard recommendations results in any untoward effects on blood lipids. This is the first 1-year longitudinal investigation in resistance trained males that demonstrates the lack of harm caused by a high protein diet.”

After seeing these studies by Antonio and colleagues, it has really put together a piece to a massive puzzle that in a real-world setting, one could have a higher daily protein intake, and overconsume protein, and get great benefits from it.

A Deeper Look at What a Higher Daily Protein Intake in the Offseason Can Really Do

A 2017 study out of the International Journal of Sports Science took 19 male bodybuilders and put them into 2 groups (5):

  • Group 1- Overfeeding subjects (mainly overfeeding with carbohydrates) and 0.8g/lb. of protein per day
  • Group 2- Protein overfeeding subjects (mainly overfeeding with protein) and 1.4g/lb. of protein per day
  • Total calories were matched and training volume was matched

The results showed that the protein overfeeding group led to increased muscle mass, reduced body fat, and improved blood panels.

 

What’s interesting in this study is it was done in bodybuilders, calories and training volume were matched, and if you do the math in practical terms, just as an example, Group 1- 150-pound male x 0.8 = 120g of daily protein and in Group 2- 150-pound male x 1.4 = 210g of daily protein. Which shows a 90g daily difference of protein intake.

Another interesting study was done by Beals and colleagues, where they took 30 female subjects and divided them into 3 groups (6):

  • Group 1- Overweight subjects
  • Group 2- Obese subjects
  • Group 3- Healthy weight subjects

They gave each group 170g of lean pork which turns into about 36g of high-quality protein post workout and showed the obese and overweight subjects had blunted muscle protein synthesis responses (prohibited your body from being in a muscle growth state) and it was most likely due to the excess body fat they were carrying.

Now, obviously, this study has a lot of limitations and the ones that stand out most are:

  • we need a larger sample size of people
  • this needs to be replicated in athletes or resistance trained subjects
  • there was no resistance training protocol
  • we don’t truly eat protein in isolation
  • more long-term studies need to be conducted

But, this could be a good start to a large puzzle on perhaps having a higher daily protein intake and staying leaner in the offseason to make sure you’re getting a daily response with muscle protein synthesis which over time will keep your body in a muscle growth state and lead to more muscle growth.

A great way to experiment with this is most likely having a higher daily protein intake like the overfeeding studies suggest and really taking advantage of the protein adaptations.

Pros-and-Cons

 

Pros and Cons of a Daily Higher Protein Intake During the Off Season

This area of research really interested us, so we ran our own individual experiments for a full month.

Now, keep in mind we controlled as much as we possibly could, these weren’t actually in lab-controlled experiments, and it was only a month.

We made some interesting observations with a high protein intake during a surplus, along with what the current data says about protein overfeeding, along with the two studies above, and we have compiled some pros and cons to having a higher protein diet during the offseason:

Pros:

  • Leads to less overeating, due to more satiety and protein being the number one most filling macronutrient
  • Increased TEF (Thermic Effect of Food) due to your body working harder to break down protein
  • If you have a personal preference to consume higher protein amounts, then this may work for you
  • There’s something about being more accurate with tracking food when you have a higher protein goal, so this may lead to eating less processed and packaged foods and being more accurate with your macros and calories as research shows misreporting is a big reason why people don’t get results (7)
  • Don’t quote us on this, but a higher protein intake during a surplus combined with a proper high-volume resistance training program may lead to further muscular adaptations. Yet, Roberts and colleagues showed there was no major difference between a high vs moderate protein intake in resistance trained subjects (8). More long-term and replicated studies need to be conducted in this specific area
  • Eating a higher protein intake post diet phase leads to lower weight re-gain due to increased muscle mass, increased REE (Resting Energy Expenditure), increased TEF (Thermic Effect of Food), and Increased satiety (9)

Cons:

  • Higher protein intake may not be a viable option if you don’t have a personal preference for a higher protein intake
  • Higher protein intake in a surplus won’t be feasible if you are vegetarian or vegan
  • Higher protein intake in a surplus could get financially expensive since protein is the most expensive macronutrient
  • The theory of a “Muscle Full Effect” could come into play (10). Some researchers have proposed that muscle protein synthesis tops out at approximately 20-25 grams of protein per serving for young adults. Protein consumed above this dosage is thought to be oxidized for energy rather than used for tissue-building purposes – a phenomenon called the “muscle-full” effect. In what is often cited as the definitive support for this contention, Areta et al investigated the effect of different protein boluses on resistance-trained men (11)
  • All subjects performed a bout of resistance training and were then confined to rest where they consumed 80 grams of protein over a 12-hour recovery period in one of the following three conditions (11):

  • 8 servings of 10 grams of protein every 1.5 hours
  • 4 servings of 20 grams of protein every 3 hours
  • 2 servings of 40 grams of protein every 6 hours

  • Over the course of the recovery period, the greatest effect on stimulation of muscle protein synthesis was seen in the group consuming 4 servings of 20 grams of protein. This would seem to indicate that there was no added benefit to consuming the higher dosage (40 grams) and that the additional amino acids were indeed oxidized for energy (11)
  • Trained individuals may have a lower requirement for protein due to increased efficiency of use of protein. Several studies have shown that resistance trained athletes, consistent with the anabolic stimulus for protein synthesis it provides, actually increases the efficiency of use of protein, which reduces dietary protein requirements (12). If indeed, regular heavy resistance training enhances efficiency, there would be no effect of added protein and body comp alterations

Practical Applications

If you are interested in trying a high protein intake during the offseason or having your clients try it, we recommend first setting your daily calorie surplus and then setting protein at 1.4g/lb.

Ex.) You are consuming 3,000 calories and you weight 175 pounds, multiply 175 x 1.4 = 245g of daily protein and multiply that by 4 (4 calories per 1 gram of protein) = 980 calories. You are then left with 2,020 calories for carbs and fats.

Then Set fat after that, anywhere from 20-30% of calories.

Then set the remaining calories as carbs and partition more of them around workouts unless you have a personal preference for other times of the day.

Experiment with it for a month or so with yourself or your clients, get both objective and subjective data from it, controlling everything as much as possible then re-evaluate everything.

Don’t expect more muscular adaptations from the higher protein intake, as this will most likely be from the calorie surplus and increased training volume in your resistance training program.

We highly recommend this for clients or those out of a long contest prep where one lost a significant amount of weight and calories became very low so most likely metabolic adaptations occurred from satiety signals being down, hunger hormones up, and reward system cravings for highly palatable foods were increased (13).

We also recommend experimenting with a higher protein intake for clients or someone that has a tendency to binge or overeat especially those post prep or dieting phase.

Wrap Up

Now that you have the secret ninja tips (HIYAAAA) to try a higher protein intake during a surplus, the biggest piece of advice we can give after self-experimenting with this and diving into the research is to have an open mind and just try it out for a month.

See how you respond to it. See how you feel. See what kind of observations you make out of it all. And just have fun with it all as this is what a flexible fitness journey should be about. Taking valid scientific research and implementing it into practice.

There’s only one thing we ask of you after having a higher protein intake during a surplus, don’t come knocking on our door after you see your weekly grocery bill?

 

Does a Higher Daily Protein Intake Keep You Leaner in the Offseason is republished from IIFYM Blog IIFYM MEMBERSHIP

]]> Bmi Vs Body Fat Can I Lose Fat Quickly? https://www.iifym.com/bmi-calculator/body-mass-index/bmi-vs-body-fat-can-i-lose-fat-quickly/ Wed, 18 Sep 2019 17:24:20 +0000 https://www.iifym.com/?p=470678---3cf40389-ca54-43c6-89ca-6b7a58798219

How do I Calculate My BMI and Body Fat?

BMI Vs. Body Fat Percentage

Body Mass Index (BMI) and Body Fat percentage are two totally different measurements that are often mistakenly considered interchangeable. Body Mass Index and Body Fat Percentage are definitely different.

 What is Body Mass Index (BMI)?

Body Mass Index is a measure of body fat based on your height and weight. Physicians widely consider BMI measurements as a simple way to determine if a person is healthy or unhealthy, underweight or overweight. It is important to note, that your BMI score is not a recommendation of what you should weigh…it’s more a general guideline.

How to Calculate your BMI

BMI = Your weight (in pounds) x 703
Your height in inches squared

Let’s look at an example of a person that is 5'7 weighing 150 pounds

BMI = 150 x 703                    BMI = 105,450               BMI= 23.49
67 x 67                                    4,490

You can use the IIFYM BMI calculator to get your BMI.

Your BMI Range

According to the American Council on Exercise (ACE), there are five different ranges or body fat categories.

Keep in mind these categories are based on body fat norms and may not be a good indicator of your specific fitness level. ACE contends that, "a person's overall health and lifestyle choices should be taken into account before making a decision about whether their percent body fat is acceptable or unacceptable."

18.5 or below is considered underweight

18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal

25.0 to 29.9 is considered overweight

30 or above is considered obese

What about Body Fat Percentage?

Body Mass Index uses your weight in the formula but unfortunately it doesn’t take into account if that weight comes from fat or lean muscle tissue. Athletes who carry an abundance of lean muscle tissue may seem rather heavy for their frame or size but that’s because muscle weighs more than fat. These particular individuals may have a rather high BMI, but not have a great deal of fat. This is where Body Fat percentage takes over. Body fat percentage is the percentage of your body that consists of fat.

Women’s Body Fat Percentage

For females: a body fat percentage of:

10-12% is considered essential fat

14-20% is considered athletic

21-24% is considered fit

25-31% is considered acceptable

32% or more is considered obese

Men’s Body Fat Percentage

For males: a body fat percentage of:

2-4% is considered essential fat

6-13% is considered athletic

14-17% is considered fit

18-25% is considered acceptable

25% or higher is considered obese

Follow these guidelines for calculating the most accurate body fat percentage.

When to Take Measurements

To get the most accurate result, take measurements first thing in the morning. Your weight can fluctuate throughout the day so it's wise to get your numbers before you've had anything to eat or drink.

What to Use

Once you've weighed yourself, you'll need to take body measurements. Use a soft, flexible (cloth or fiberglass) tape measure. Don’t use an elastic tape measure.

How to Take Your Measurements

When you measure the circumference of each body part, the tape should feel firm enough against your skin so that it stays in place but not so tight that it causes an indentation.

You can use English or metric units. The measurements required for men and women are slightly different. Women require a bit more data.

Men

Current weight. Use a digital scale if possible.

Waist circumference. Take the measurement at the largest part of your belly, usually right at the level of your belly button. Make sure that the tape measure stays level to the floor. Don't hold your breath or suck in to get the measurement.

Women

Current weight. Use a digital scale if possible.

Waist circumference. Take the measurement at the largest part of your belly, usually right at the level of your belly button. Make sure that the tape measure stays level to the floor. Don't hold your breath or suck in to get the measurement.

Wrist circumference. Measure around the smallest part of your wrist. You may need a partner to help with this measurement as it’s hard to measure one-handed.

Hip circumference. Measure around the largest part of your hips, usually at the posterior extension of the gluteals (the place where your butt extends back).

Forearm circumference. Measure around at the widest part of your arm below your elbow. It’s easiest to have a partner get this measurement. Keep your arm relaxed during the measurement and let it hang alongside your body (don't bend or flex the arm while measuring).

Once you’ve gathered your numbers, input the data to calculate your body fat percentage.

Body Fat Calculator

Why Measure Body Fat Percentage?

Whether you liked your result or not, you may wonder why body fat percentage matters. if your goal is weight loss, you might be tempted to use a scale for feedback on your progress. But body fat percentage tells you much more than the scale does.

When you're trying to slim down, boost your health, or increase your level of fitness, fat loss should be your goal, rather than simple weight loss. You want to keep the lean mass, or fat-free mass, that your body needs. This includes bone, blood, connective tissue, organs, and muscle.

Muscle loss sometimes occurs when you are losing weight, but it's not the kind of weight loss you’re looking for. You want to maintain muscle mass because it helps your body function and perform more efficiently, boosts your metabolism, and gives your frame a lean, tight appearance.

By measuring changes in body fat percentage, you can tell how well your fitness or weight loss program is helping you to lose fat while maintaining fat-free mass.

 

The following article Bmi Vs Body Fat Can I Lose Fat Quickly? was originally published on IIFYM ONLINE IIFYM MEMBERSHIP

]]>

How do I Calculate My BMI and Body Fat?

BMI Vs. Body Fat Percentage

Body Mass Index (BMI) and Body Fat percentage are two totally different measurements that are often mistakenly considered interchangeable. Body Mass Index and Body Fat Percentage are definitely different.

 What is Body Mass Index (BMI)?

Body Mass Index is a measure of body fat based on your height and weight. Physicians widely consider BMI measurements as a simple way to determine if a person is healthy or unhealthy, underweight or overweight. It is important to note, that your BMI score is not a recommendation of what you should weigh…it’s more a general guideline.

How to Calculate your BMI

BMI = Your weight (in pounds) x 703
Your height in inches squared

Let’s look at an example of a person that is 5'7 weighing 150 pounds

BMI = 150 x 703                    BMI = 105,450               BMI= 23.49
67 x 67                                    4,490

You can use the IIFYM BMI calculator to get your BMI.

Your BMI Range

According to the American Council on Exercise (ACE), there are five different ranges or body fat categories.

Keep in mind these categories are based on body fat norms and may not be a good indicator of your specific fitness level. ACE contends that, "a person's overall health and lifestyle choices should be taken into account before making a decision about whether their percent body fat is acceptable or unacceptable."

18.5 or below is considered underweight

18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal

25.0 to 29.9 is considered overweight

30 or above is considered obese

What about Body Fat Percentage?

Body Mass Index uses your weight in the formula but unfortunately it doesn’t take into account if that weight comes from fat or lean muscle tissue. Athletes who carry an abundance of lean muscle tissue may seem rather heavy for their frame or size but that’s because muscle weighs more than fat. These particular individuals may have a rather high BMI, but not have a great deal of fat. This is where Body Fat percentage takes over. Body fat percentage is the percentage of your body that consists of fat.

Women’s Body Fat Percentage

For females: a body fat percentage of:

10-12% is considered essential fat

14-20% is considered athletic

21-24% is considered fit

25-31% is considered acceptable

32% or more is considered obese

Men’s Body Fat Percentage

For males: a body fat percentage of:

2-4% is considered essential fat

6-13% is considered athletic

14-17% is considered fit

18-25% is considered acceptable

25% or higher is considered obese

Follow these guidelines for calculating the most accurate body fat percentage.

When to Take Measurements

To get the most accurate result, take measurements first thing in the morning. Your weight can fluctuate throughout the day so it's wise to get your numbers before you've had anything to eat or drink.

What to Use

Once you've weighed yourself, you'll need to take body measurements. Use a soft, flexible (cloth or fiberglass) tape measure. Don’t use an elastic tape measure.

How to Take Your Measurements

When you measure the circumference of each body part, the tape should feel firm enough against your skin so that it stays in place but not so tight that it causes an indentation.

You can use English or metric units. The measurements required for men and women are slightly different. Women require a bit more data.

Men

Current weight. Use a digital scale if possible.

Waist circumference. Take the measurement at the largest part of your belly, usually right at the level of your belly button. Make sure that the tape measure stays level to the floor. Don't hold your breath or suck in to get the measurement.

Women

Current weight. Use a digital scale if possible.

Waist circumference. Take the measurement at the largest part of your belly, usually right at the level of your belly button. Make sure that the tape measure stays level to the floor. Don't hold your breath or suck in to get the measurement.

Wrist circumference. Measure around the smallest part of your wrist. You may need a partner to help with this measurement as it’s hard to measure one-handed.

Hip circumference. Measure around the largest part of your hips, usually at the posterior extension of the gluteals (the place where your butt extends back).

Forearm circumference. Measure around at the widest part of your arm below your elbow. It’s easiest to have a partner get this measurement. Keep your arm relaxed during the measurement and let it hang alongside your body (don't bend or flex the arm while measuring).

Once you’ve gathered your numbers, input the data to calculate your body fat percentage.

Body Fat Calculator

Why Measure Body Fat Percentage?

Whether you liked your result or not, you may wonder why body fat percentage matters. if your goal is weight loss, you might be tempted to use a scale for feedback on your progress. But body fat percentage tells you much more than the scale does.

When you're trying to slim down, boost your health, or increase your level of fitness, fat loss should be your goal, rather than simple weight loss. You want to keep the lean mass, or fat-free mass, that your body needs. This includes bone, blood, connective tissue, organs, and muscle.

Muscle loss sometimes occurs when you are losing weight, but it's not the kind of weight loss you’re looking for. You want to maintain muscle mass because it helps your body function and perform more efficiently, boosts your metabolism, and gives your frame a lean, tight appearance.

By measuring changes in body fat percentage, you can tell how well your fitness or weight loss program is helping you to lose fat while maintaining fat-free mass.

 

The following article Bmi Vs Body Fat Can I Lose Fat Quickly? was originally published on IIFYM ONLINE IIFYM MEMBERSHIP

]]> Does Every Flexible Diet Plan Have A Moderate to High Carbohydrate Intake? https://www.iifym.com/iifym-calculator/does-every-flexible-diet-plan-have-a-moderate-to-high-carbohydrate-intake/ Wed, 18 Sep 2019 17:24:19 +0000 https://www.iifym.com/?p=50463---d5450f6b-f86a-43cb-b697-eba3d8e6fbba

 

We get pigeon-holed as carb-zealots that denote other ways of eating. When it's the correct scenario we prefer to provide our clients and readers with moderate carbs in their diet plan.

This doesn't mean that we are averse to eating a little more fat or protein in lieu of carbs. We understand that preference and needs are a factor in creating a diet plan. This is why we truly support a multitude of macro splits for our clients and followers.

noodles-rice-potatoes-food-46280-1568x1039

The Reality of the IIFYM Diet Plan

Following IIFYM is meant to be flexible, sustainable and a long-term solution for altering one's physique while creating a healthy existence (both physically and mentally).

When we provide a program such as our Macro Blueprint or numbers from the macro calculator, the macro split can be altered rather easily!

The end goal is for you to see success with as much ease as possible if that means consuming more fat than provided, that's okay. The most vital aspect is that you have a sustainable calorie deficit.

 

Does Every Flexible Diet Plan Have A Moderate to High Carbohydrate Intake? is republished from www.iifym.com IIFYM MEMBERSHIP

]]>

 

We get pigeon-holed as carb-zealots that denote other ways of eating. When it's the correct scenario we prefer to provide our clients and readers with moderate carbs in their diet plan.

This doesn't mean that we are averse to eating a little more fat or protein in lieu of carbs. We understand that preference and needs are a factor in creating a diet plan. This is why we truly support a multitude of macro splits for our clients and followers.

noodles-rice-potatoes-food-46280-1568x1039

The Reality of the IIFYM Diet Plan

Following IIFYM is meant to be flexible, sustainable and a long-term solution for altering one's physique while creating a healthy existence (both physically and mentally).

When we provide a program such as our Macro Blueprint or numbers from the macro calculator, the macro split can be altered rather easily!

The end goal is for you to see success with as much ease as possible if that means consuming more fat than provided, that's okay. The most vital aspect is that you have a sustainable calorie deficit.

 

Does Every Flexible Diet Plan Have A Moderate to High Carbohydrate Intake? is republished from www.iifym.com IIFYM MEMBERSHIP

]]> What’s The Bmr Formula? Can you lose weight by eating your BMR? https://www.iifym.com/bmr-calculator/how-to-calculate-bmr/whats-the-bmr-formula-can-you-lose-weight-by-eating-your-bmr/ Wed, 18 Sep 2019 17:24:18 +0000 https://www.iifym.com/?p=470672---24d676e0-78b4-4cc8-93d6-948f6e303c90

This Is How To Work Out Your BMR, And Then How To Understand And Utilize That Information

What Is the Definition of Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR)?

Basal metabolic rate, or BMR, is the measurement of an organism's energy expenditure when at rest. To put that in more simple everyday terms, your BMR is, in essence, the amount of energy required to maintain life, when you are not eating or exercising. The act of eating or exercising requires extra energy, which is why those two activities are removed from the equation.

Let's Work Out Your Individual BMR

How do I calculate my BMR?

Many people underestimate the number of calories or energy it takes to simply go about your everyday life. Think of all the functions that occur subconsciously, such as breathing, blinking, pumping blood around your body, growing new cells, etc. The list is virtually endless, and that is before you undertake even the most basic of exercise, such as taking a short walk to the local store.

In layman's terms, the amount of energy (calories) that your body needs just to function when resting over twenty-four hours is known as the basal metabolic rate or BMR. The minimum requirements in terms of energy/calories requires a considerable number of calories, even if you are literally sitting around resting on a sun lounger all day. In fact, the BMR accounts for over 60 percent of the total amount of energy your body burns every single day.

In an ideal world, you would be able to flick a switch and alter your BMR overnight, and while this is not an option, you can modify it over time provided you know specific vital figures. By working out the calculation, and then manipulating your BMR and body to work for you, it is entirely feasible to develop a smarter strategy for weight loss and a healthier lifestyle.

Is There A Standard BMR That Everyone Shares?

Statistically speaking, as you might imagine, everyone has a unique and individual, but as there is an average for both men and women.

For women, the average BMR in the United States is 1,493 calories.

For men, the average BMR in the United States is 1,662 calories.

what is bmr basal metabolic rate

BMR - The Basics

Calculating your individual BMR with 100 percent accuracy would require an appointment with an expert, who has the facilities available, to measure your carbon dioxide and oxygen levels. This measurement would need to take place after the subject has slept for 8 hours and fasted for twelve.

Although there is a benefit to getting the measurement perfectly right, for the vast majority of people, a rough estimation will suffice. This is possible by using the Mifflin-St. Jeor equation which was developed and put into mainstream use in 1990. In fact, amongst the experts in the field, this method is now considered the standard for calculating BMR.

This Is The Equation Used To Calculate Your BMR

For men: BMR = 10 x weight (kg) + 6.25 x height (cm) – 5 x age (years) + 5

For women: BMR = 10 x weight (kg) + 6.25 x height (cm) – 5 x age (years) – 161

The good news is that you don't need to be a math nerd to work out your BMR, because you can simply use our FREE BMR Calculator.

Why Are Height and Weight Relevant?

Simply put, the larger a person is, the more fuel they will require just to sustain their larger organs. Consequently, if you are heavier or taller than average, then you will also have a higher BMR. Following the same thought process, as and when you lose eight, your BMR will also decrease, because your body will need to burn fewer calories to operate. Alternatively, if you start to visit the gym regularly and build up muscle mass, then your BMR will increase.

Other Factors To Take Into Consideration

Age - Your metabolic rate will decrease with age because statistically, it has been shown that muscle mass declines by between five and ten percent every decade after you reach your 30th birthday. You can counteract this somewhat by engaging in weight training to try and replace lost muscle mass. Concentrate on circuit training, with exercises such as squats, lunges, and core exercises. Although it might seem tempting to focus on individual muscle groups, this is not generally regarded as being as efficient in strengthening your body.

Gender: The composition of the body varies quite significantly between men and women, which is why a woman's BMR is, on average, about five to ten percent lower than that of a man.

What Does Your BMR Tell You?

Your BMR tells you the amount of energy typically measured in calories which your body needs to function properly when resting during the course of a 24 hour period. Although it is highly unlikely ever to happen unless you are ill, the idea is to measure the number of calories your body would use if you spent 24 hours in bed resting.

What Is The Average BMR Rate?

The average BMR rate will vary between males and females. The average BMR rate for an American woman is about 1400 calories, and for a man, it is about 1800.

Should I Aim For A Higher BMR Rate?

Truthfully, there is no such thing as a good BMR rate. Do not become obsessed with your BMR rate; it is merely your base metabolic rate. Think of it as nothing more than the number of calories which you require to maintain your weight when you are doing nothing on a particular day. In basic terms, if you want to lose weight then consume fewer calories than your BMR, if you want to gain weight consume more calories than your BMR.

 

The article What’s The Bmr Formula? Can you lose weight by eating your BMR? was originally published to IIFYM STORE IIFYM MEMBERSHIP

]]>

This Is How To Work Out Your BMR, And Then How To Understand And Utilize That Information

What Is the Definition of Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR)?

Basal metabolic rate, or BMR, is the measurement of an organism's energy expenditure when at rest. To put that in more simple everyday terms, your BMR is, in essence, the amount of energy required to maintain life, when you are not eating or exercising. The act of eating or exercising requires extra energy, which is why those two activities are removed from the equation.

Let's Work Out Your Individual BMR

How do I calculate my BMR?

Many people underestimate the number of calories or energy it takes to simply go about your everyday life. Think of all the functions that occur subconsciously, such as breathing, blinking, pumping blood around your body, growing new cells, etc. The list is virtually endless, and that is before you undertake even the most basic of exercise, such as taking a short walk to the local store.

In layman's terms, the amount of energy (calories) that your body needs just to function when resting over twenty-four hours is known as the basal metabolic rate or BMR. The minimum requirements in terms of energy/calories requires a considerable number of calories, even if you are literally sitting around resting on a sun lounger all day. In fact, the BMR accounts for over 60 percent of the total amount of energy your body burns every single day.

In an ideal world, you would be able to flick a switch and alter your BMR overnight, and while this is not an option, you can modify it over time provided you know specific vital figures. By working out the calculation, and then manipulating your BMR and body to work for you, it is entirely feasible to develop a smarter strategy for weight loss and a healthier lifestyle.

Is There A Standard BMR That Everyone Shares?

Statistically speaking, as you might imagine, everyone has a unique and individual, but as there is an average for both men and women.

For women, the average BMR in the United States is 1,493 calories.

For men, the average BMR in the United States is 1,662 calories.

what is bmr basal metabolic rate

BMR - The Basics

Calculating your individual BMR with 100 percent accuracy would require an appointment with an expert, who has the facilities available, to measure your carbon dioxide and oxygen levels. This measurement would need to take place after the subject has slept for 8 hours and fasted for twelve.

Although there is a benefit to getting the measurement perfectly right, for the vast majority of people, a rough estimation will suffice. This is possible by using the Mifflin-St. Jeor equation which was developed and put into mainstream use in 1990. In fact, amongst the experts in the field, this method is now considered the standard for calculating BMR.

This Is The Equation Used To Calculate Your BMR

For men: BMR = 10 x weight (kg) + 6.25 x height (cm) – 5 x age (years) + 5

For women: BMR = 10 x weight (kg) + 6.25 x height (cm) – 5 x age (years) – 161

The good news is that you don't need to be a math nerd to work out your BMR, because you can simply use our FREE BMR Calculator.

Why Are Height and Weight Relevant?

Simply put, the larger a person is, the more fuel they will require just to sustain their larger organs. Consequently, if you are heavier or taller than average, then you will also have a higher BMR. Following the same thought process, as and when you lose eight, your BMR will also decrease, because your body will need to burn fewer calories to operate. Alternatively, if you start to visit the gym regularly and build up muscle mass, then your BMR will increase.

Other Factors To Take Into Consideration

Age - Your metabolic rate will decrease with age because statistically, it has been shown that muscle mass declines by between five and ten percent every decade after you reach your 30th birthday. You can counteract this somewhat by engaging in weight training to try and replace lost muscle mass. Concentrate on circuit training, with exercises such as squats, lunges, and core exercises. Although it might seem tempting to focus on individual muscle groups, this is not generally regarded as being as efficient in strengthening your body.

Gender: The composition of the body varies quite significantly between men and women, which is why a woman's BMR is, on average, about five to ten percent lower than that of a man.

What Does Your BMR Tell You?

Your BMR tells you the amount of energy typically measured in calories which your body needs to function properly when resting during the course of a 24 hour period. Although it is highly unlikely ever to happen unless you are ill, the idea is to measure the number of calories your body would use if you spent 24 hours in bed resting.

What Is The Average BMR Rate?

The average BMR rate will vary between males and females. The average BMR rate for an American woman is about 1400 calories, and for a man, it is about 1800.

Should I Aim For A Higher BMR Rate?

Truthfully, there is no such thing as a good BMR rate. Do not become obsessed with your BMR rate; it is merely your base metabolic rate. Think of it as nothing more than the number of calories which you require to maintain your weight when you are doing nothing on a particular day. In basic terms, if you want to lose weight then consume fewer calories than your BMR, if you want to gain weight consume more calories than your BMR.

 

The article What’s The Bmr Formula? Can you lose weight by eating your BMR? was originally published to IIFYM STORE IIFYM MEMBERSHIP

]]>